Tag Archives: Coding

Odd Git Licensing Message on OSX

Today,IOS 7 dropped to the general public. As usually comes with the release, there was an Xcode update. I updated.

 

For some time, I’ve been using the git bundled in Xcode as it makes it simpler to get updates as they come with Xcode. Today, that yielded an amusing message.

I use git via an alias in my .bashrc

alias git='xcrun git'

A simple version check reveals all:

 

git –version

xcode-git-message

Oops… git is apparently subject to Apple’s licenses.

Use vi key bindings in bash

A long time ago I used ksh with vi key bindings, and life was good.

Then I moved on to bash, but for some reason, I never investigated using vi key bindings. I simply lived with the defaults (which, for the record, are emacs-like key bindings).

So, just the other day I said to myself, “Self, I want to use vi key bindings in bash. I want to again experience the joy of traversing and editing my command line in COMMAND MODE. I want the speed and the power of my precious vi (well, I use vim) at my finger tips. And I NO LONGER want to waste time holding arrow keys or to think about using emacs-like commands.”

So, I fired up google.com; low and behold I stumbled onto this little post about using vi key bindings in bash and zsh. So sweet!

In a nutshell, the bash command to enable vi mode is:

set -o vi

This can be set in your .bashrc file, and if it doesn’t pickup when you start a new terminal session, add something like this to your .profile or .bash_profile:

if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
. ~/.bashrc
fi

With vi mode enabled, you’ll start your bash session in insert mode, so things should behave as normal. But, to turn on the power, just hit the ESC key to enter COMMAND MODE. 🙂 Now all your vi commands are availble. Move to end of line with “$”, beginning of line with “^”, delete a word with “dw”, etc.

Enjoy!